Fast Running Definition: Your Brain Dictates The Pace, Not The Body!

Studies on the definition of fast running have discovered that during the enemy, the brain dictates the pace. For example, if it’s hot, the brain expects the body to heat up and slow down, as it approaches the end of the race, the brain screams, “Here we have arrived,” and causes the speed to increase.

What is the definition of fast running?

True, in order for us to run well the feet must be trained, but in reality, the brain dictates the pace in the case of fast running!

If you were like most runners, you discovered the importance of the pace of the enemy after the experience and severe suffering. You start the enemy very quickly and as it should during the first round, but you soon find it difficult to finish the second half of the enemy and learn from this lesson.

In the next attempt, you stay strong so that you can complete the race without reaching vomiting. Over time, you find yourself facing a new dilemma: on the one hand, you keep the pace of the enemy well, but on the other, you feel comfortable.
The definition of fast running and improving the pace of the enemy is running for a certain distance in the shortest time without breaking down your powers, so a very sophisticated art.

The reason for this is that even when we look at the clock, the idea that guides us, whether we should increase the pace, slow it down, or maintain the same pace is the level of discomfort that we think we can deal with.

Until recently, researchers of “effort” did not give much importance to the mental aspect of the pace of the enemy. The common claim was that if you slow the pace in the second half of the enemy, it is likely that body temperature has risen too much or accumulated too much lactic acid (or lactic acid) in the blood (fatigue that produces a chemical).

Dr. Ross Tucker, an effort physiologist from the University of Cape Town in South Africa, and a large group of researchers believe that in addition to these reasons, there is another complex system that works during the enemy.

Their study shows that our brain reads messages coming from the organs, cells, and tissues during the enemy; after receiving these messages, the brain uses this information to set and identify the enemy’s initial frequency and to increase it later. Understanding how these inner senses work is the key to being a good and more powerful runner.

Pace science

Effort researchers adopted the idea of ​​a German researcher, who says the brain controls the pace. In 1996. e. B Olmert claimed that if you perform a task, your brain focuses on the endpoint and therefore, it starts counting down with the calculation of the maximum effort that can be drawn from the exercise to the end.

Several years ago, Tucker and his colleagues, including effort physiologist Dr. Timothy Noaks, began an experiment that examined Olmert’s theory.

The theory is called “Anticipatory organization” – according to this theory, the brain predicts when the enemy is expected to end and accordingly regulates the pace.

“The brain controls voltage performance to protect the body from reaching a point of failure or a harmful level of effort,” Tucker says.

How does the brain know the final limit? Tucker answers the question thus: “The brain receives signals from the body and interprets these signals in the context of dealing with effort.”

Tucker explains: The brain reads the intensity of the voltage and examines with all the different systems in the body (energy, fluid, temperature) Is it possible to maintain a certain frequency that enables us to finish the race, “then the brain changes the running of the muscles to slow the speed of hostility or allow it to increase the speed”.

In one of Tucker’s studies, two groups of riders measured the pace at cold and hot temperatures. Not surprisingly, riders who walked in hot climatic conditions were slower.

However, the group of riders who walked in hot climates reduced the pace unnoticed within five minutes of the start of the measurement before their body temperature rises.

“The fact that they are slowed down too early, shows that the pace is determined by the brain, before an athlete’s physiological factor indicates a lowered pace,” claims Dr. Craig Keane, a sports psychologist and lecturer at the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Long. Beach. “You don’t slow down because you feel the heat, you slow down because you expect to feel the heat.”

Says Dr. Carl Foster, a professor of mathematical research from the University of Wisconsin. Although predicted regulation works in a way that prevents you from hurting yourself, sometimes the brain can be very conservative and slow down early. How can you prevent your brain from making you slow down so early? “We did research on this, and it seems that the best way your brain learns is through exercise.”

“The more you exercise the more effort and fatigue your brain becomes more precise about your true abilities. Running at a competitive pace at least three times during the pre-race training makes your brain know your body’s abilities.”

Cayenne proposes another strategy: fragmentation of training – passivity. “The enemy in the second half of the training is faster than the first half, which trains you to go beyond the mind when trying to make you slow down in the second half of the race.”

These enemy techniques, help your body and brain, get used to the effort required, in order to perform any training or race at the optimal pace for you.

How can we not slow down the brain?

Feeling tired is often just from the head. Your body usually has more energy to follow. Say it to yourself when your mind tries to slow down.
Think about it, you can practice at a certain enemy pace, but remember that in addition there is a power to think. Psychotherapist and lecturer Dr. Cayenne proposes dividing the distance. “Say your strength,” says Cayenne. During the first part of the race (the first kilometer of the five-kilometer race and the second kilometer of the 10-kilometer race), restrain yourself to resist adrenaline which can cause you to move away from the target and slow down too early.
Keep the focus, halfway, you should focus, Keane says. “Your mind will try to make you slow down because he thinks you need to conserve energy, and when you are aware of it you can fight that feeling.
Training, says Kean, “If you train correctly, you don’t have to slow down to the end, and if you keep a steady pace, you won’t have the energy to increase the pace dramatically in the few meters before the finish line.” Another example is the side of the brain that shouts “I have almost arrived” while you have not yet arrived: “If you hear it at the 32 km of the marathon, block this idea.
More than half of the marathon records achieved at a steady pace. But most of the marathon indices were in accordance with the negative division of the pace.

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